5 Thoughts You Have While Traveling In Japan

If you ever get the opportunity to visit the beautiful and fascinating country of Japan, here are some thoughts you probably will have throughout your trip.

And if you already have visited the country and fallen victim to these thoughts, congratulations we're on the same boat.

1. There's so much good FOOD

When in Japan, you simply have to devour everything in sight because it all looks too good. Some of my personal favorites are ramen, sushi, donuts from Mister Donut and traditional Japanese snacks made from red bean paste or mochi.

A wide selection of donuts from Mister Donut, a donut shop chain located all throughout Japan.

A wide selection of donuts from Mister Donut, a donut shop chain located all throughout Japan.

Ramen made with a soy sauce-based soup.

Ramen made with a soy sauce-based soup.

Traditional Japanese 'mitsu-an' made with fruits, gelatin, red bean paste, mochi balls, and a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Traditional Japanese 'mitsu-an' made with fruits, gelatin, red bean paste, mochi balls, and a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Pancakes from  Nine Pancake House    in Shimokitazawa, Tokyo.

Pancakes from Nine Pancake House in Shimokitazawa, Tokyo.

2. So Many Cafes

Japan is famous for its many types of unique cafes including (but not limited to) cat cafes, 'maid cafes', rabbit cafes, and more. When I visited Tokyo, I went to the Kawaii Monster Cafe, which opened in Harajuku in summer 2015. Created by the a famous Japanese artist who likes all things 'strange', the cafe is made to be the inside of a 'kawaii' ('cute' in Japanese) monster's stomach. The cafe is home to crazily decorated sitting areas, waitresses dressed as monsters, and very brightly colored foods. Throughout Japan, there is a wide selection of different cafes to go to depending on your preferences for what kind of experience you want.

Entrance to Kawaii Monster Cafe, Harajuku.

Entrance to Kawaii Monster Cafe, Harajuku.

Inside the cafe, there's a giant cake 'merry-go-round' as the centerpiece.

Inside the cafe, there's a giant cake 'merry-go-round' as the centerpiece.

An order of a blue teriyaki chicken burger and rainbow-colored pasta.

An order of a blue teriyaki chicken burger and rainbow-colored pasta.

3. That tech tho.

Japan is one of the most technologically advanced countries in the world. In addition to its mind boggling inventions and new infrastructure, Japan is also famous for its quirky gadgetsBut we've got to admit that some of those inventions are pretty useful.

The Tokyo Skytree.

The Tokyo Skytree.

Akihabara or "Electric City", Tokyo

Akihabara or "Electric City", Tokyo

4. Why does everything need to be so cute?

From pencils and plates to water bottles and junk food, somehow everything is cutely shaped, designed, or decorated in Japan. Every store, even the 100 yen shop (equivalent to the 99 cent store in the U.S.), is able to offer the cutest and trendiest items for such an affordable price.

Small cakes in the shape of teddy bears.

Small cakes in the shape of teddy bears.

A steamed meat bun that looks like a life buoy with Donut Duck in it.

A steamed meat bun that looks like a life buoy with Donut Duck in it.

5. You get the best of both worlds.

Japan has the best of the both worlds: it preserves its historical and traditional culture while allowing the growth of new technology and advanced infrastructure. Within blocks in just one city, you're able to see elaborately decorated Buddhist temples and a towering skyscraper. This visible contrast between the old and new generations of Japan's cities is what puts it apart from all other countries in the world. In addition, Japan also maintains an ideal balance between its rural countrysides and populated urban cities.

The Scramble   Crossing in Shibuya, Tokyo.

The Scramble Crossing in Shibuya, Tokyo.

The Kaminarimon gate which leads to the Senso-ji temple in Asakusa,   Tokyo.

The Kaminarimon gate which leads to the Senso-ji temple in Asakusa, Tokyo.

Vegetable fields in the countrysides of Japan.

Vegetable fields in the countrysides of Japan.